• Adjusting the pace of Foundations lessons

    We recently received the following question from a parent using Logic of English Foundations with her son.

  • Advanced Phonogram Flash Cards

    Forty-six Advanced Phonograms unlock thousands of advanced vocabulary words.
  • Blending Game

    Supplies Needed: 1 Game board piece per student, scissors

    Directions: Cut out the game cards. Place them face down in four piles sorted by color. Explain that the student needs to lead the horses to the barn. Place a marker at the beginning of the board. The student draws a card that matches the color space his game piece is on. Each time he reads it correctly without help, he may advance two spaces. Each time he reads it correctly with help, he advances one space.

    The game board and game pieces are provided for free in a printable PDF file. Download the PDF file here.

  • Doodling Dragons App

    This playful introduction to the sounds of the alphabet opens the door for children to hear, say, recognize, and read single-letter phonograms. When children learn all the sounds made by each letter, they take a giant leap toward becoming strong readers and spellers.

  • Engaging My Wild Child through Logic of English Foundations

    Guest post by Heather Aliano

    My middle child has a favorite book. We sit and read Where the Wild Things Are more often than I can count. He squeals with joy when the wild rumpus starts, and he stops around the room, growling his terrible growls and gnashing his terrible teeth. He loves to tell me, with a gleam in his eye, that he is MY "wild child."

    The boy isn't kidding. His favorite activities involve running, and jumping, and yelling, and attempting to fly, and wiggling, and laughing, and throwing things, and "battling" everything at his height. He is stubborn. He wants to be the boss at all times. He is a joy to have around, a happy little ball of fire. He's also a handful. Or an armful as the case may be.

  • Foundations Samples

    Sample Pages

    Click the links below to view sample pages from the Logic of English® Foundations curriculum.
    You can view more excerpts from the curriculum in our guided tour of Foundations.
    Foundations A: Lessons 1-40
    Teacher's Manual Student Workbook - Cursive Student Workbook - Manuscript Readers
    Foundations B: Lessons 41-80
    Teacher's Manual Student Workbook - Cursive Student Workbook - Manuscript Readers
    Foundations C: Lessons 81-120
    Teacher's Manual Student Workbook Readers
    Foundations D: Lessons 121-160
    Teacher's Manual Student Workbook Readers
    Foundations Spelling Lists
    Video Tour
     

    Intro to Foundations. A video introduction to Foundations with author Denise Eide. See how the components of a lesson fit together and how phonemic awareness, phonics knowledge, reading, spelling, vocabulary, and comprehension develop over the course of the four levels. Filmed live at a Logic of English training.

  • Foundations Scope and Sequence

            PDF Versions
    LessonPhonemic AwarenessPhonogramsSpelling RulesHandwritingReading/SpellingVocabComprehension & FluencyGrammarWriting
    Lesson Phonemic Awareness Phonograms Spelling Rules Handwriting Reading/Spelling Vocab Comprehension & Fluency Grammar Writing
    Foundations A
    1 Develop a kinesthetic awareness of how sounds are formed. Learn that two words can be blended together to form a new word. Become familiar with lines on paper. Learn the swing stroke.
    2 Develop a kinesthetic awareness of how sounds are formed. Practice blending two words into one word. Learn the down stroke. Review the lines and the swing stroke.
    3 Practice distinguishing sounds from one another. Learn to auditorily blend sounds into words. Learn the roll stroke.
    4 Listen for /th/ and /TH/. Practice blending words together. Learn the curve stroke or the straight stroke.
    5 Compare the sounds /s/, /z/ and /th/. Distinguish sounds in isolation. Practice blending sounds into words. Learn the phonogram a.
    Review Lesson A
    6 Distinguish sounds in isolation. Practice blending sounds into words. Learn the phonogram d.
    7 Listen for sounds at the beginning of words. Practice blending sounds into words. Learn the drop-swoop stroke.
    8 Listen for sounds at the beginning of words. Practice blending sounds into words. Learn the phonogram g.
    9 Listen for sounds at the beginning of words. Practice blending sounds into words. Learn the phonogram c.
    10 Practice blending sounds into words. Learn to segment words into sounds. Learn the phonogram o.
    Review Lesson B
    11 Practice listening for sounds at the beginning of words. Practice blending consonants. Practice segmenting words. Learn the drop-hook stroke.
    12 Practice listening for sounds at the beginning of words. Practice blending consonants. Practice segmenting words. Learn the phonogram qu.
    13 Learn how to sort vowels and consonants. Practice blending consonants. Practice segmenting words into sounds. Learn the scoop or curve stroke.
    14 Review the difference between consonants and vowels. Practice blending consonants. Practice distinguishing vowel sounds in isolation. Learn the phonogram s.
    15 Identify phonograms at the beginning of words. Practice blending consonants. Practice distinguishing vowel sounds in isolation. Learn the cross stroke.
    Review Lesson C
    16 Practice distinguishing vowel sounds. Review segmenting words. Learn the phonogram t.
    17 Identify the phonogram at the beginning of the word. Practice blending and segmenting. Learn the phonogram i.
    18 Practice identifying phonograms at the beginning of the word. Practice blending words together. Learn the circle stroke.
    19 Identify the phonogram at the beginning of the word. Learn the phonogram p.
    20 Practice listening for sounds at the end of the word. Learn the phonogram u.
    Review Lesson D
    21 Practice listening for sounds at the end of the word. Learn the phonogram j. cat, dad, sad, sit, dug
    22 Learn to identify the phonogram at the end of the word. Learn the phonogram w. up, pig, pup, sat, it
    23 Practice identifying the phonogram at the end of the word. Learn to connect phonograms with the dip stroke (cursive only). dog, cop, top, pot, pop
    24 Practice identifying phonograms at the end of the word. Learn the bump stroke. jug, dig, cup, tap, dip
    25 Practice identifying phonograms at the end of words. Practice consonant blends. Learn the phonogram r. rat, jog, wig, rip, pat
    Review Lesson E
    26 Identify the vowel sound heard in the middle of the word. Practice consonant blends. Learn the phonogram n. can, and, quit, nut, nap
    27 Practice identifying vowels heard in the middle of words. Practice consonant blends. Learn the phonogram m. Learn to leave a space between words.
    Learn about spaces between words.
    28 Practice identifying vowels heard in the middle of the word. Practice consonant blends. Learn the loop stroke or slant stroke. map, man, mom, gum, tan
    29 Identify vowel sounds heard in the middle of the word.
    Practice consonant blends.
    Learn the phonogram e. pen, jet, pet, net, wet
    30 Listen for vowels. Practice consonant blends. Learn the phonogram l. quilt, log, men, mad, leg
    Review Lesson F
    31 Match the initial sounds of words to the phonogram. Practice blends. Learn the phonogram b. big, sand, ran, bad, bend
    32 Identify the beginning sound and match it to the phonogram. Practice blends. Learn the phonogram h. red, bat, hit, dot, band
    33 Create new words by changing the first sound. Practice blends. Learn the phonogram k. sink, honk, skunk, ink, link
    34 Create new words by changing the first sound. Learn the phonogram f. fast, nest, list, best, last
    35 Blend multi-syllable words. Learn the phonogram v. van, vest, kid, win, rest
    Review Lesson G
    36 Learn about short vowel sounds and how to mark them. Learn the phonogram x. box, milk, tent, wax, fist
    37 Review the short vowel sounds. Learn the phonogram y. yes, jump, six, skin, skip
    38 Learn about long vowel sounds. Learn the phonogram z. if, zip, fox, flag, flap
    39 Review short and long vowel sounds. bed, sun, wind, stomp, stamp
    40 Celebration day
    Review Lesson H
    Foundations B
    41 Review short and long vowel sounds. Learn sh. Learn uppercase S. fish, ship, flash, spot, drum
    42 Counting syllables. Learn th. Learn uppercase T. this, fit, that, drip, quiz
    43 Learn about syllables. A E O U usually say their long sounds at the end of the syllable. Learn uppercase F. he, she, go, so, drop
    44 Review syllables. Sentences begin with an uppercase letter and end with an end mark. Learn uppercase H. we, is, thin, had, did
    45 Learn about schwa as a lazy vowel sound. Learn uppercase M. a, his, the, then, path
    Review Lesson A
    46 Create new words by changing the first sound. Learn ck. Learn uppercase N. with, duck, quack, math, track
    47 Create new words by changing the initial sound. Two-letter CK is used only after a single, short vowel. Learn uppercase A. be, me, shut, rock, shot
    48 Practice blending. Learn igh. Learn uppercase D. black, light, night, wish, snack
    49 Practice blending. Learn ch. Learn uppercase B. chin, chick, no, bright, bath
    50 Review short and long vowel sounds. Learn ee. Learn uppercase P. three, back, see, feel, thick
    Review Lesson B
    51 Review syllables. Learn er. Learn uppercase R. her, green, thank, deer, check
    52 Review syllables. Learn wh. Learn uppercase W. when, which, get, stand, queen
    53 To make a word plural, just add -S. English words do not end in I, U, V, or J.
    Learn oi oy.
    Learn uppercase U. boy, coin, feed, joy, bunch
    54 Review short and long vowels. Learn ai ay. Learn uppercase I. play, tail, day, sleep, cheer
    55 Compare the sounds /f/ and /v/. Learn uppercase J. of, as, has, free, click
    Review Lesson C
    56 Review long and short vowel sounds. The vowel says its long sound because of the E. made, name, stop, time, may
    57 Review: the vowel says its long sound because of the E. Learn uppercase K. bike, nine, street, grape, high
    58 Learn that U has two long vowel sounds. Review reading questions. Learn uppercase V. fire, cute, pick, flute, sheep
    59 Review the ways to make a vowel say its long sound. Silent E words. Learn uppercase Y. like, ride, keep, pink, quick
    60 Change the initial sound to form new words. Learn ng. Learn uppercase C. thing, sing, clock, snake, note
    Review Lesson D
    61 Listen for silent final E’s. English words do not end in V. Learn uppercase E. have, give, smile, ask, sick
    62 Review the long sounds of U. English words do not end in U. Learn uppercase O. blue, true, must, save, game
    63 Review how to spell Silent Final E words. Learn uppercase Q. take, love, song, drive, glue
    64 Learn to rhyme words. Learn ar. Learn uppercase G. car, far, same, jar, ring
    65 Practice rhyming words. Learn or. or, for, much, gave, sight
    Review Lesson E
    66 Learn about broad vowel sounds. Learn uppercase L. want, wash, to, snail, cave,
    67 Explore the broad /ü/ sound. We often
    double ff.
    Learn uppercase X. put, off, stuff, star, chair
    68 Practice short, long, and broad vowels. We often double ll. Learn uppercase Z. ball, tall, do, tray, trail
    69 Practice short, long, and broad vowels. We often double ss. class, mess, short, pull, shall
    70 Practice rhyming words. We occasionally double other letters. egg, buzz, bring, cake, way
    Review Lesson F
    71 Test multi-letter vowels and consonants. Learn tch. catch, watch, hill, glass, rope
    72 Strategies for reading phonograms with
    multiple sounds
    Learn ow. cow, snow, tell, corn, hatch
    73 Strategies for reading phonograms with multiple sounds Learn ou. out, round, what, less, sting
    74 Strategies for reading phonograms with multiple sounds Learn ough. was, thought, that, wall, king
    75 Review syllables and plurals. I, you, your, flour, dough
    Review Lesson G
    76 Practice rhyming words. pay, paid, say, said, white
    77 Read say, says, and said. says, down, right, feet, make
    78 English words do not end in I, U, V, or J. Y says long I at the end of a one syllable word. by, show, fly, pass, ate
    79 Strategies for reading phonograms with
    multiple sounds
    Learn ea. great, my, team, cry, grass
    80 Change the initial sound to form new words. Learn oa. read, won, boat, coat, head
    Review Lesson H
    Foundations C
    81 Review compound words. Learn ir. Compare and contrast trains and cars. girl, bird, slow, long, though Compound Words Pre-reading,
    Following directions
       
    82 Learn ur. hurt, rainbow, airplane, near, while Compound Words Trains: A Blast of Fast    
    83 Learn ear. Copywork learn, through, small, bread, outside Compound Words Re-reading. Explore strategies for understanding unknown words.    
    84 Practice “say to spell” words that end with an unaccented /ä/. When a word ends with the phonogram A, it says /ä/. A may also say /ä/ after a W and before an L. Dictation birthday, grandma, type, leave, warm Compound Words Reading riddles    
    85 Review the schwa sound. Learn wor. Compare trains and airplanes speak, world, work, first, grandpa Compound Words High Frequency Words    
    Review Lesson A
    86 Learn that suffixes can be added to words. O may say /ŭ/ before V, TH, M, N and after W.. Make a chart to brainstorm ideas. from, front, turning, years, well ING Words Following directions Pre-reading,    
    87 Practice adding suffixes to words. Learn wr. write, into, young,
    growing, rowing
    ING Words Write & right Firefly: Nightlight with Wings    
    88 Double the consonant. Copywork running, sitting, earth, count, these ING Words Re-reading    
    89 Distinguish long and short vowel sounds. Double the consonant. Dictation biggest, hottest, home, pointing, hearing EST Words Order a sequence of events.    
    90 Reading words with the three sounds of oo. Learn oo. Write keywords about fireflies. soon, book, teeth, tooth, without Identify keywords in a text. High Frequency Words.    
    Review Lesson B
    91 Forming new words with -OLD. I and O may say /ī/ and /ō/ before two consonants. Model how to write a chart to brainstorm ideas. old, cold, cook, here, need Pre-reading, Following directions    
    92 Forming new words with -IND. I and O may say /ī/ and /ō/ before two consonants. find, late kind, teacher, farmer ER Words Kids Can Do Great Things!    
    93 Listen for the /s/ and /z/ in plurals. To make a word plural add the ending -S, unless the word hisses or changes, then add -ES. Copywork move, both, today, gold, now Plurals Re-reading, Learn about credits on pictures.    
    94 Listen for the /ĕ/ in some plurals. Learn kn. To make a word plural add the ending -S, unless the word hisses or changes, then add -ES. Dictation myself, dresses, know, floor, door Plurals No & know Follow directions to complete a picture search activity.    
    95 Learn gn is used both at the beginning and the end of the word. Review syllables. Learn gn. Write a list. Write a patterned sentence. sign, those school, moon, starting, High Frequency Words    
    Review Lesson C
    96 Learn about open and closed syllables. A, E, O, U usually say their long sounds at the end of the syllable. over, beside, between, feather, going Learn the importance of keywords. Read a description of a bird and match it to the correct picture.    
    97 Review open and closed syllables. Learn bu. Practice A, E, O, U usually say their long sounds at the end of the syllable. open, buy, robot, other, paper Ostriches    
    98 Practice reading words that begin with the schwa sound. Learn gu. Review A, E, O, U usually say their long sounds at the end of the syllable. Copywork about, guide, above, before, afraid Comparison Re-reading.    
    99 Create new words that end in dge. Learn dge. Dictation bridge, pretend, real, more, around Read and follow directions.    
    100 Learn ph. Write key words about ostriches. again, phone, below, spell, our High Frequency Words    
    Review Lesson D
    101 Review syllables. C softens to /s/ before an E, I, or Y. center, look, circus, computer, camera Review ING words Read and follow directions.    
    102 Learn ei. The C says /s/ because of the E. water, their, race, eat, bounce Morphemes Robots    
    103 Learn ey. Practice reading silent final E words. Copywork face, they, reuse, group, return The prefix RE- Re-reading    
    104 Learn eigh. G may soften to /j/ before an E, I, or Y. Dictation. Write a list. Use commas in a series. eight, replace, gem, sound, gym Keywords    
    105 Learn how to count the syllables by counting the vowels. Learn cei. The G says /j/ because of the E. Learn how to write a list and use commas in a series. even, large, ceiling, page, often High Frequency Words    
    Review Lesson E
    106 Create new words that end in -LE. Every syllable must have a written vowel. apple, orange, little, together, food Learn to identify the main idea in a paragraph.    
    107 Further explore open and closed syllables. Learn ew. Practice silent E rules. new, table, purple, letter, brown Dolphins    
    108 Learn ui. Add a silent E to make the word look bigger. Copywork are, were, fruit shape, huge The prefix UN- Identify the main idea in a paragraph. Use keywords.    
    109 Review the meaning of the -S in plurals. Add an E to keep singular words that end in -S from looking plural. Dictation horse, swimsuit, house, change, fisherman Find the main idea.    
    110 Learn oe. Unseen reason for a silent E. Review silent final E’s. Write a sentence from keywords. come, some, toes, mouse, uncle High Frequency Words    
    Review Lesson F
    111 Listen for the sounds of ed in past tense words. Learn ed. Write descriptive words. done, planted, pushed, called, tunnels Past tense Practice reading three-syllable words. Pre-reading    
    112 Learn aw. Copywork missed, saw, draw, person, followed Match the past and present tense forms of a word. Ha Long Bay    
    113 Y says /ē/ only at the end of a multi-syllable word. Dictation city, invented, happy, area, instead Past tense, antonyms Re-reading    
    114 Learn au. Practice Y says /ē/ only at the end of a multi-syllable word. Write using descriptive words. baby, twelve, copy, because, story Read a myth.    
    115 Learn augh. Write descriptive words to create a travel brochure. laugh, many, taught, here, there High Frequency Words    
    Review Lesson G
    116 Learn about words with a silent L. Learn ie. Keywords fields, walking, talked, early, fullest The prefix UN- Pre-reading    
    117 Read words with a silent L. Copywork would, could, should, each, hold The prefix UN- Rickshaws Draw a picture of a rickshaw based upon the descriptions in the book.    
    118 Learn ti. Dictation better, action, station, away, across Re-reading    
    119 Learn si. Practice describing an object. most, confusion, party, might, window Read a non-fiction article about the history of bikes and answer questions.    
    120 Learn ci. Writing a description special, chicken, caution, never, country Read and follow directions. High Frequency Words    
    Review Lesson H
    Foundations D
    121 Polar Opposites by Erik Brooks
    mother, penguin, opposite, where, how, polar, morning, different
    Antonyms
    The prefix ant-
    Identify ways that Alex and Zina are opposites. A sentence begins with a capital letter. Create a book of opposites.
    122     Review the reasons for a silent final E. The Arctic and the Antarctic: Polar Opposites by Denise Eide
    alone, lone, one, twin, twice, two, twelve, twenty
    Fiction and nonfiction.
    Review antonyms.
    Learn to use a glossary.
    Sort books into fiction and nonfiction.
    A sentence ends with an end mark. Copywork
    123     Learn about suffixes. Are you My Mother? by P.D. Eastman
    eleven, three, thirteen, thirty, four, fourteen, forty, hundred
    Practice reading numbers. Elements of a story: conflict and main character
    Read questions with expression.
    Questions Dictation
    124     Add suffixes to words. Are you My Mother? by P.D. Eastman
    five, fifteen, fifty, six, sixteen, sixty, seven, seventy
    Review antonyms. Are You My Mother? with a focus on reading with expression. Exclamations Create a book of numbers.
    125     Add suffixes to words. Baby Birds by Denise Eide
    eight, eighteen, eighty, nine, nineteen, ninety, zero, nothing
    The suffixes -ty and -teen Review fiction and nonfiction. Learn how to define new words from context. Practice using a glossary.
    Read numbers fluently.
    Choose the correct punctuation for the end of sentences. Complete the book of numbers.
    Review Lesson A
    126     I and Y may say /ĭ/ or /ī/ at the end of a syllable. Little Bear by Else Holmelund Minarik
    title, friend, something, family, soup, waited, flew, goodness
    Learn about the table of contents. Identify the key elements of a story. Put events in order. Identify nouns that are people. Write a summary with support.
    127     Form irregular plurals of words ending in O. Little Bear by Else Holmelund Minarik
    space, eye, climb, beautiful, carrots, potato, tomato, honey
    Identify the key elements of a story. Retell the story orally. Identify nouns that are places. Copywork
    128     Drop the silent final E when adding a vowel suffix. Little Bear by Else Holmelund Minarik
    giant, quiet, go, goes, do, does, compare, asleep
    Make inferences. Connect a story to the student’s own experience.
    Read questions with inflection.
    Identify nouns that are things. Dictation
    129     Drop the silent final E when adding a vowel suffix. Little Bear by Else Holmelund Minarik
    very, along, comb, only, once, hair, princess, castle
    Answer questions about the story. Discuss how different parts of the story connect with one another. Nouns Make a list.
    130     Review adding a suffix to words ending in a silent final E. Bears, Bears, and More Bears by Denise Eide
    share, easy, super, nice, hour, maybe, wrong, any
    Learn strategies for reading a text with captions. Editing Write captions for images.
    Review Lesson B
    131     Read words with unstressed -OR. Should I Share My Ice Cream? by Mo Willems
    somewhere, ice, cream, flavor, color, live, problem, awesome
    Discuss how the students identify with the story.
    Read with expression.
    Capitalize proper nouns that are specific people. Write text in speech bubbles.
    132     Drop the silent final E when adding a vowel suffix only if it is allowed by other spelling rules. Go, Dog. Go! by P.D. Eastman
    worry, father, why, who, lake, hurry, however, difference
    The suffix -able Recognize the use of repetition.
    Read with expression.
    Capitalize proper nouns that are specific places. Create a poster of antonyms.
    133     Drop the silent final E when adding a vowel suffix only if it is allowed by other spelling rules. Carp: Unexpected Consequences by Denise Eide
    radio, dirty, holding, solve, flower, police, amazing, bowl
    Learning academic vocabulary from context. Make predictions. Practice using a glossary.
    Learn to use a pronunciation key.
    Capitalize proper nouns that are specific things. Copywork
    134     Drop the silent final E when adding a vowel suffix only if it is allowed by other spelling rules. A Fish Out of Water by Helen Palmer
    try, pool, yelled, please, bully, will, sponge, fireman
    Abbreviations Identify the problem in the story. Retell the story orally. Use context to determine the meaning of an unknown word. Review common and proper nouns. Dictation
    135     Drop the silent final E when adding a vowel suffix only if it is allowed by other spelling rules. A Fish Out of Water by Helen Palmer How to Train a Goldfish by Denise Eide
    afternoon, forever, everywhere, another, broom, safe, haircut, wave
    Abbreviations Using background knowledge, identify plays on words or hidden elements of humor within a story. Editing Brainstorming
    Review Lesson C
    136     Recognize single-vowel Y. The Best Nest by P.D. Eastman
    chimney, straws, gasp, pretty, sweater, build, barrel, mattress
    The prefix mis- Identify the main character. Discover the lesson within the story and discuss its application to the student’s life. Verbs Copywork
    137     Single-vowel Y changes to I when adding any ending, unless the ending begins with I. My Nest is Best! by Miriam Eide
    exactly, tight, messy, remember, wear, smooth, weave, search
    Make predictions. Draw conclusions about why birds build different types of nests. Verbs Dictation
    138     Single-vowel Y changes to I when adding any ending, unless the ending begins with I. Ling & Ting: Not Exactly the Same by Grace Lin
    money, magic, magician, taste, tricky, tie, decide, owl
    Synonyms Use a table of contents. Make predictions. Compare and contrast Ling and Ting. Nouns and verbs Create a Venn diagram.
    139     Single-vowel Y changes to I when adding any ending, unless the ending begins with I. Ling & Ting: Not Exactly the Same by Grace Lin
    supper, fairy, tale, bought, sneeze, least
    Synonyms Conduct additional research to understand the reference to “old Chinese money.” Nouns and verbs Create a Venn diagram. Use a Venn diagram to describe characters.
    140     Review how to add a suffix. Ling & Ting: Not Exactly the Same by Grace Lin
    brother, sister, parents, aunt, children, cousin, marry, heart
    Answer questions about the book. Discuss how all people have differences. Editing Compare and contrast Ling and Ting using a Venn diagram.
    Review Lesson D
    141 Review plurals. Henry and Mudge: The First Book by Cynthia Rylant, pages 5-17
    floppy, ghost, sorry, straight, told, curly, lemon, chocolate
    Identify the reasons Henry wanted a dog. Discuss whether Mudge solved the problem. Discuss connections to the student’s life. A sentences needs a subject and a verb. Create a mind map to describe Mudge.
    142     Change the Y to I and add -ES. Henry and Mudge: The First Book by Cynthia Rylant, pages 18-40
    almost, evening, lose, tears, body, smell, vanilla, tornado
    any Discover the problem and solution in the story. Answer questions about the text. Identify the subject and the verb. Copywork
    143     Change the Y to I and add -ES. Mr. Putter & Tabby Pour the Tea by Cynthia Rylant & Arthur Howard
    pour, muffin, company, second, delight, store, deaf, tea
    Make predictions. Simple sentences Dictation
    144     Assimilation: SU sometimes says 
    /shu/ or /zhu/. Practice plurals.
    Mr. Putter & Tabby Pour the Tea by Cynthia Rylant & Arthur Howard
    sugar, perfect, sure, among, swallowed, worm, cheese, poisonous
    Mr. Putter & Tabby Pour the Tea. Simple sentences Mr. Putter & Tabby Pour the Tea.
    145   Review plurals. Frog or Toad? by Miriam Eide
    everything, began, begin, summer, people, tongue, rough, distance
    Learn academic vocabulary from a text. Closely reread a text while taking notes. Editing Make a graphic organizer, sorting what is true about all frogs and what is unique about toads.
    Review Lesson E
    146     Stressed and unstressed syllables Frog and Toad Together by Arnold Lobel
    piece, cloth, clothes, pocket, knock, ready, blew, connected
    Homophones:
    too and two
    Identify the main character, problem, and solution. Identify fragments. Write a to-do list.
    147     Stressed and unstressed syllables Frog and Toad Together by Arnold Lobel
    sharp, garden, quite, few, loudly, noise, frightened, candle
    Homophones:
    too and two
    Make predictions. Put events in chronological order. Fragments Copywork
    148     Stressed and unstressed syllables Frog and Toad Together by Arnold Lobel
    cookie, baked, power, ladder, sadly, wonder, mountain, tremble
    Homophones:
    meat and meet
    Use the text to determine the meaning of a new word. Identify the main character, problem, and solution. Draw connections with the student’s life. Fragments Dictation
    149     Double the last consonant when adding a vowel suffix. Frog and Toad Together by Arnold Lobel
    brave, mirror, shout, shadow, spinning, screamed, bottom, closet
    Homophones:
    whole and hole
    Discuss how the characters feel. Decide whether you agree or disagree with the characters’ definition of bravery. Fragments Use a graphic organizer to collect phrases that demonstrate that Frog and Toad felt afraid and were brave.
    150     Assimilation: TU sometimes says
    /chu/
    Frog and Toad Together by Arnold Lobel
    stage, costume, answer, presenting, piano, strange, dance, adventure
    Review homophones. Identify how the characters are feeling. Discuss bragging. Discover the lesson within the story. Editing Use emotion words to trace the emotional arc of the story.
    Review Lesson F
    151     Double the last consonant when adding a vowel suffix to words ending in one vowel followed by one consonant. Many Kinds of Feet by Denise Eide
    slipping, elephant, swoop, danger, balance, enemy, threaten, animal
    Learn academic vocabulary from context. Make inferences using the text and images. Subject-verb agreement Create a pattern book.
    152     The advanced phonogram E says /ā/. Practice the suffixing rules. Dodsworth in New York by Tim Egan
    favorite, pedal, pancake, crazy, calm, grabbed, everybody, nobody
    Recognize and discuss how characters feel and what they want. Subject-verb agreement Copywork
    153     Double the last consonant when adding a vowel suffix to words ending in one vowel followed by one consonant. Dodsworth in New York by Tim Egan
    arrive, stare, breathe, believe, excitement, angry, worth, ocean
    Contractions Identify how a character feels about a situation. Identify emotion words. Make a prediction. Subject-verb agreement Dictation
    154     Double the last consonant when adding a vowel suffix to words ending in one vowel followed by one consonant. Dodsworth in New York by Tim Egan
    grumble, amazed, square, island, view, fancy, stadium, statue
    Contractions Discuss ways a character tries to solve a problem in a story. Discuss changes in a character’s feelings at different points in the story. Commas in a series Write simple sentences with picture prompts.
    155     Dodsworth in New York by Tim Egan
    ticket, ruined, snore, farther, throw, wheel, half, appearance
    Contractions adventure. Editing Write about an adventure.
    Review Lesson G
    156     Add a suffix to any word. Mouse and Mole by Miriam Eide
    ground, shook, hole, fetch, backyard, temperature, whiskers, continuously
    Review contractions. Use context to determine the meaning of unknown words. Use facts from the text to identify mice and moles. Adjectives Write facts about mice and moles.
    157     Add a suffix to any word. Upstairs Mouse, Downstairs Mole by Wong Herbert Yee
    claws, neighbor, idea, tidy, twirl, dropped, paw, exclaimed
    The suffix -y Discuss the lessons in the text. Discuss what might have happened if the characters had handled the conflict differently. Adjectives Copywork
    158     Spellings of /sh/ Upstairs Mouse, Downstairs Mole by Wong Herbert Yee
    invite, invitation, celebrate, celebration, continue, occasion, stomach, squeak
    Identify the problem in the story. Discuss possible solutions. Practice reading words with TI, CI, and SI. Nouns and adjectives Dictation
    Optional: write an invitation.
    159     Spellings of /sh/ Upstairs Mouse, Downstairs Mole by Wong Herbert Yee
    picture, jacket, cover, zipped, dessert, button, nibble, wrapping
    Discuss the solution to Mouse and Mole’s problem. Discuss applications to the student’s life.
    Practice reading words with TI, CI, and SI.
    Adjectives and nouns Write a description of Mouse or Mole.
    160     Upstairs Mouse, Downstairs Mole by Wong Herbert Yee
    guess, scratched, paddle, disappear, decorate, behind, surprise, definitely
    Discover a problem in the story and identify its solution. Locate the solution within the text. Editing
    Adjectives and nouns
    Write a book review.
  • Foundations Spelling Lists

    Foundations Spelling Lists

    Logic of English® Foundations focuses on guiding students into reading, teaching spelling simultaneously because practicing encoding strengthens decoding skills. Starting in the second half of Foundations A, each lesson includes a spelling list to be dictated and analyzed together. The process of spelling analysis helps students practice segmenting, blending, encoding, and decoding as they apply the phonograms and spelling rules they are learning.

    In the first three levels of Foundations, each spelling list is carefully controlled for the phonograms, spelling rules, and other linguistic tools that have been taught. The lists focus on teaching high-frequency words, since the ability to decode these words automatically is a key component in developing reading fluency. Students hundreds of high-frequency words over the course of levels , , and in the context of linguistically accurate phonics. As they learn the high-frequency words, they develop skills that equip them to read thousands more.

    By the time students begin Foundations , they have learned all the basic phonograms and the spelling rules they need to read most English words, so the lists no longer need to be controlled by phonogram. The lessons begin to focus more on applying the phonograms and rules for spelling while continuing to place the main emphasis on fluency and comprehension in reading. The Foundations D spelling lists are a combination of additional high-frequency words, a number of common words with unusual spellings shaped by morphology, and vocabulary from the children's books used in the lessons.


    View the Spelling Lists for each level of Foundations!
  • Grammar Cards

    Eighty-three Grammar Cards introduce key grammar concepts.
  • How to Help Wiggly Kids Love Reading

    A beta tester for Logic of English Foundations posted an amazing review on her blog, Only Passionate Curiosity, about her active 4.5 year old son who loves reading.

  • Overcoming Visual Challenges: Learning to Read and Write with LOE Foundations

    We recently received the following letter from Adriana Buttafoco. Adriana has been beta testing our Foundations Curriculum.

  • Phonemic Awareness

    Thread 1: Phonemic Awareness

    Research shows that students must understand that words are made of sounds and recognize that sounds combine into words before they can read successfully. Foundations, especially level A, places a strong emphasis on developing students’ phonemic awareness in preparation for reading.

    Click on the thumbnails to see excerpts from the lessons.
    • 1. In Foundations A lesson 1, students learn about the sounds /p/, /b/, /f/, and /v/—both how they sound in their ears and how they form them in their mouths. Click on the thumbnails for an excerpt from this lesson.
    • 2. During lesson 2, in addition to continuing to explore individual sounds, students also begin to think about words as a group of sounds working together as they practice forming compound words. Click the thumbnail to see excerpts from the Teacher's Manual and Student Workbook.
    • 3. Several other Phonemic Awareness activities from Foundations A that explore segmenting, blending, and vowels and consonants.

    The Foundations tour continues below. To learn more about Phonemic Awareness, visit our Research section.

    Next step: LINGUISTICALLY ACCURATE PHONICS
  • Phonogram Game Cards

  • Phonogram Mp3/CD

    An audio reference guide to phonogram sounds.
  • Rhythm of Handwriting Quick Reference

    A teacher’s dream for handwriting instruction!
  • Sample Reading Lesson - C

    Foundations Tour Part I: Reading Comprehension Lesson

    Our tour begins near the end of Foundations C with a reading comprehension unit on Vietnam's Ha Long Bay.

    We start at this point in order to demonstrate the end goal of Foundations: the strong reading and comprehension skills students develop by the time they finish level C (and continue to strengthen in D). The tour will then take you to the earliest building blocks of Foundations and guide you through the curriculum to show you how we get here.

    The Ha Long Bay unit, in which students read, analyze, discuss, and write about this region of Vietnam, is found in lessons 111-115 of Foundations, near the end of Level C (lessons 81-120). In these lessons students also continue to learn new phonograms and spelling rules, practice spelling, develop phonemic awareness, and play a variety of games, but this stage of our tour focuses on the sections in which students practice their reading comprehension skills and learn about Ha Long Bay.

    Look inside the lessons! Click the images to enlarge

    • 1. Students begin their exploration of Ha Long Bay with a pre-reading activity in Lesson 111.
    • 2. In Lesson 112, students read the 10-page reader "Ha Long Bay" for the first time and give initial responses about what they have understood thus far. The eight Foundations C readers are informative non-fiction texts exploring a variety of creatures, cultures, and creations.
    • 3. In Lesson 113, students re-read "Ha Long Bay" and begin to explore the text more deeply on the levels of both words and larger meaning. They employ higher-order comprehension skills as they encounter new vocabulary, look for keywords, summarize, analyze, and interpret. Sample scripting in the Teacher's Manual offers suggested questions for guiding students in their explorations and strengthening their comprehension.
    • 4. Students continue to explore Ha Long Bay during lesson 114. They practice comprehension skills as they read "The Myth of Ha Long Bay" in the student workbook. In a related writing activity, they practice using descriptive words.
    • 5. Lesson 115 concludes with a creative project. This culminating writing activity for the unit incorporates reading comprehension, use of descriptive language, writing, spelling, and visual skills as students synthesize and respond to what they have learned about Ha Long Bay.

    Reading lessons, continued: Sample reading comprehension lessons from Foundations D.

    Next step: ADVANCED READING LESSON
  • Sample Reading Lesson - D

    Foundations Tour Part I: Advanced Reading Comprehension Lesson

    Our tour continues with another reading lesson mid-way through Foundations D, which most students complete in late first or early second grade. This lesson explores birds' nests.

    Having learned all 74 basic phonograms by the end of Level C, students in Foundations D are able to focus on developing increasing reading fluency and comprehension skills as they apply what they have learned to more and more words and books. They also learn more about spelling and beginning to explore the basics of grammar.

    Students are now familiar with all the spelling rules and phonograms needed to decode 98% of English words, so they are no longer limited to phonics-controlled texts (or texts controlled by sight words and patterns, like many early children's readers). The Foundations D lessons integrate non-fiction readers and a variety of children's fiction texts.

    Look inside the lessons! Click the images to expland

    • 1. Students begin their exploration of Ha Long Bay with a pre-reading activity in Lesson 111.
    • 2. In Lesson 112, students read the 10-page reader "Ha Long Bay" for the first time and give initial responses about what they have understood thus far. The eight Foundations C readers are informative non-fiction texts exploring a variety of creatures, cultures, and creations.
    • 3. In Lesson 113, students re-read "Ha Long Bay" and begin to explore the text more deeply on the levels of both words and larger meaning. They employ higher-order comprehension skills as they encounter new vocabulary, look for keywords, summarize, analyze, and interpret. Sample scripting in the Teacher's Manual offers suggested questions for guiding students in their explorations and strengthening their comprehension.
    • 4. Students continue to explore Ha Long Bay during lesson 114. They practice comprehension skills as they read "The Myth of Ha Long Bay" in the student workbook. In a related writing activity, they practice using descriptive words.
    • 5. Lesson 115 concludes with a creative project. This culminating writing activity for the unit incorporates reading comprehension, use of descriptive language, writing, spelling, and visual skills as students synthesize and respond to what they have learned about Ha Long Bay.

    In Foundations D, children read a new fiction book or non-fiction reader in every single lesson! This level is designed to help them become confident, fluent readers as they apply and practice the language skills they have learned in levels A-C.


    How does Foundations help students get to this point?

    Foundations provides a linguistically accurate understanding of how English works, weaving together the threads of phonemic awareness, systematic phonics, vocabulary, fluency, comprehension, writing, and spelling to form a holistic approach to language arts. As students develop language skills, they continue to practice and build upon them in a carefully designed progression that paves the way for success in reading and writing.

    The next stage of your tour will highlight how the different threads are interwoven throughout Foundations.

    Next step: FOLLOWING THE THREADS OF READING
  • Spelling Analysis Card

    The perfect teacher's reference for dictating and analyzing spelling words.
  • Spelling Rule Flash Cards

    Thirty-one spelling rules in a concise practice tool that develops critical thinking.
  • Student Whiteboard

    A high-quality student response board for teaching handwriting and for practicing phonograms and spelling words.
  • Tactile Cards - Manuscript or Cursive

    Feel, see, and hear how to write lowercase and uppercase letters and the numbers 0-9.
  • Using and Organizing LOE Flash Cards

    Guest blog post by Lori Archer. Lori is a homeschool parent and former classroom teacher, who uses both Essentials and Foundations.

    The Logic of English is a brilliant and fun language arts program. LOE effectively and efficiently integrates spelling, grammar, phonics, and writing. And, Logic of English integrates lots of cards (LOTS of cards!): phonogram cards, spelling rule cards, game cards, and this is if you are just doing Essentials. Add in Foundations and you add in more cards. The cards are what make practice and reinforcement engaging for the children, but they can prove to be an organizational dilemma for the instructor.

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